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Capt Arthur de Bells Adam (MC)
1885 - 1916


CPL David Wallace Crawford
1887 - 1916

Lce-Corpl John Joseph Nickle
1894 - 1916


Pte 17911 Morton Neill
1897 - 1916


Lieut Edward Stanley Ashcroft
1883 - 1918
Lieut Edward Stanley Ashcroft

Liverpool Pals Who Died on This Day

Sgt 15718 Charles Kenneth Imison

From: Runcorn, Cheshire
D.O.W (104 Years this day)
Wednesday 9th August 1916.
27 years old

Charles Kenneth was the son of Edwin Imison and his wife Mary Elizabeth (nee Savage). His parents were married 15/8/1882 at All Saints, Runcorn. Charles Kenneth was born in 1889 and christened 03/02/1889 at All Saints, Runcorn.

1891 Census - Highfield House, Runcorn - Parents Edwin and Mary with children Kathleen M, John A, Christopher S and Charles K.

1901 Census - Heatherlea, Weston Road, Runcorn - Edwin and Mary with Kathleen M, John A, Charles K, Christopher S, Marjorie, Geoffrey H and Isabel E,

1911 Census - Heatherlea, Weston Road, Runcorn - Edwin and Mary Elizabeth with Kathleen Mary, John Alwyne, Christopher Savage, Charles Kenneth, Marjorie, Geoffrey Halton and Isabel Elizabeth. Father Edwin was a Pawnbroker and had been married to Mary for 28 years. Charles Kenneth was an Engineering Student.

Charles Kenneth’s service record shows that he enlisted 2.9.1914 in Liverpool, joining the 17th Battalion as Private 15718. He gave his age as 25yrs 245 days old, was 5’8¼” tall, weighed 178lbs and had a 40” chest.

He was married on 06/7/1915 to Dorothy Blanche Moyle at the Parish Church, Prees. They had a son Charles Kenneth Halton Imison on 20/4/1916 and sadly he never got to see his son.

Charles Kenneth was offered a commission as a Lieutenant in the regiment in January 1915 but turned it down. His service record shows his parents were sent a telegram saying he had been seriously wounded but then a later one informed them he had died. There seems to have been a mix up about informing his wife with telegrams being sent to an old address. He was wounded on 30th July but the family only received notification on 9th August. In the Runcorn News 11th August a report shows that both Kenneth and Geoffrey had been injured, no details were available regarding Kenneth, although Geoffrey had been wounded in the head and body and was in Whalley Hospital in Blackburn and had been visited by his parents. Service records for Charles Kenneth state that he had a gun shot wound in his thigh.

Charles Kenneth was a well known and popular figure in Runcorn and was a member of the Institute of Civil Engineers. He was educated at Liverpool College Upper School at Zurich and afterwards at Liverpool University where he qualified with honours as a Bachelor of Engineering. In 1913 after qualifying he was appointed assistant engineer at the Castner-Kellner works, Weston Point, where he had previously served his apprenticeship. He went to France with the first draft of the “Pals” and was in charge of a machine gun section. He spoke French and German fluently, and his special abilities made him a valuable soldier.

He was a Serjeant when he died of wounds on 09/08/1916, aged 27. He is buried at Abbeville Communal Cemetery where his headstone contains the epitaph:

"LIFE'S WORK WELL DONE. LIFE'S CROWN WELL WON.NOW COMES REST".

He is also commemorated on the War Memorials at Liverpool University and Liverpool College, Sefton Park. 

Two of Charles Kenneth’s brothers accepted commissions, John Alwyn Imison in the Royal East Surry Regiment, he was severely wounded and received the Military Cross in 1917. Geoffrey Halton had joined the 17th Kings Liverpool with Charles Kenneth, but later served with the Yorks and Lancaster Regiment as a 2nd Lieutenant. Both of the brothers survived the war.

His father Edwin Imison died 14/10/1918 and his Mother Mary died 31/07/1932.

His wife Dorothy Blanche re-married in 1920 to Ronald Turner .

 

Pte 36764 Thomas Christopher Jervis

From: Liverpool
D.O.W (104 Years this day)
Wednesday 9th August 1916.

Thomas Christopher Jervis was born in 1897 in Liverpool and was the son of Christopher and Mary Ann (nee Thomas) of 15 St Jude’s Place, Liverpool. They married on the 2nd December, 1889 at St Simon C. of E. Church in Liverpool.

Mary Ann was born in 1869 and was the daughter of John and Mary Thomas. She was baptised on the 6th February, 1870 in Liverpool.

The 1901 Census shows the family living at 42 Lowwood Street, Liverpool.

The father Christopher is aged 33, born 1868 and is a wood machinist, his wife Mary Ann is aged 30, born 1871 and they have three children, Emma Jane aged 11, born 1890, Sarah Alice aged 7, born 1894 and Thomas Christopher aged 4, born 1897.

The 1911 Census shows the family living at 15 St Jude’s Place, Liverpool. 

The father Christopher now aged 43, born 1868 is a Sawyer’s labourer (furniture) and was born in Liverpool as was his wife Mary Ann aged 42, born 1869 and their remaining siblings. They have been married for 22 years and have thirteen children of which six had died. Emma aged 20, born 1891 and working in a mineral factory, Sarah aged 16, born 1895 a domestic servant, Thomas aged 14, born 1897 is a Sawyer’s labourers, Elizabeth aged 8, born 1903, Margaret aged 5, born 1906, Harriet aged 2, born 1909 and Christopher born 1911. They also have boarders living at the property Alice Blake a charwoman aged 49, born 1862 and her three children Annie, aged 14, born 1897, Lily aged 7, born 1904 at school and Joseph aged 2, born 1909.

(The vagaries of Census records show years of birth changing from 1901 to 1911 for several family members and Mary Ann Jervis is named as Margaret on the 1911 Census Record. It is certain that her name has been input wrong as the census shows they have been married for 22 years which corroborates the date of the Jervis marriage. Thomas Christopher Jervis is also shown as Thomas E Jervis on Census records with both 1901 and 1911 showing the same year of birth, with the 1911 Census showing the Initial E after his christian name only.  )

He enlisted in Liverpool and was serving in the 17th Battalion, The King’s Liverpool Regiment as Private No 36764 when he died of wounds on the 9th August, 1916 aged 21 during the Somme offensive.

He now lies in Dantzig Alley Cemetery, Mametz, France.

We currently have no further information on Thomas Christopher Jervis, If you have or know someone who may be able to add to the history of this soldier, please contact us.

Pte 22247 Thomas Pemberton Saul

From: Preston, Lancs
D.O.W (104 Years this day)
Wednesday 9th August 1916.
27 years old

Thomas Pemberton Saul was born on the 29th June, 1899 in Preston and was the son of Robert and Mary Jane. Saul, of Preston and the husband of Amy Saul, of 50, Grafton St., Preston. He was a former reserve team player for Preston North End. He married Amy (nee Howard) on the 7th April, 1915 at Christ Church, Preston. After marriage they lived at 50 Grafton Street, Preston.


The 1911 Census shows the family living at 38 New Road, Higher Walton, Walton-Le -Dale.  

The father Robert aged 48, born 1863 occupation Cotton Weaving Manager and was born in Preston as were all his children. His wife Mary Jane aged 46, born 1865 has no occupation listed and was born in Leyland, Lancashire. They have been married for 24 years and have six children. Beatrice aged 23, born 1888 is a cotton weaver, Thomas Pemberton aged 22, born 1889 is an Architect’s clerk with the County Council, Frank aged 20 born 1891 is a clerk with the County Council, Harold Banister aged 16, born 1895 is also a clerk for a hot water engineer, Gladys aged 14, born 1897 is a cotton weaver and Norman aged 11, born 1900 is at school.

Amy was born in 1891 and was employed as a postal and telegraph clerk. She was the daughter of Amos and Alice Howard of 24 Grafton Street Preston (1911 Census.) During the war she had volunteered as a nurse.

He enlisted on the 5th November, 1914 in Liverpool and gave his age as 25 years and his occupation as a surveyor. He was five feet five and half inches tall, weighed 132lbs, had a fresh complexion, blue eyes, brown hair and gave his religion as Church of England.

He was serving in the 20th Battalion, The King’s Liverpool Regiment as Private No 22247, during the attack on the village of Guillemont on the 30th July, 1916 and was wounded with a gunshot wound to the shoulder and was transferred to 5th Casualty Clearing Station on the same day and died of his wounds at No. 10 General Hospital, Rouen on the 9th August, 1916 aged 27.

He now lies in St sever Cemetery, Rouen, France.

He is also commemorated on the War Memorial, Christ Church, Preston.

Probate on his estate was on the 26th September, 1916 to his widowed wife Amy of £107 and 6s.

We currently have no further information on Thomas Pemberton Saul, If you have or know someone who may be able to add to the history of this soldier, please contact us.

His brothers Frank and Harold also served in the Liverpool “Pals”












 
2nd Lieutenant Frank Pockett Mccormick

From: Liverpool
(102 Years this day)
Friday 9th August 1918.
28 years old

Homage has been paid by great commanders and by writers who have carefully studied the psychology of the New Armies to the magnificent spirit and soldierly capacity of the volunteers from the office. Born and reared in an atmosphere of peace, unaccustomed to discipline and to hardship, inured not at all to the nerve-wracking horror of death and mutilation, our civilian volunteers revealed in the hour of supreme national crisis the abiding qualities of British blood, the spirit and the fire of generations of fighting ancestors.
To this type of soldier belonged Frank Pockett McCormick, of 7, St. Michael's Road, Aigburth, who less than a month after war broke out left his work in a Liverpool shipping office to enlist at the call of his country, and after an honourable service in the army at the age of twenty eight died of wounds received on August 9th in the last year of the conflict. 

He was the only son of Mr John and Mrs. Ellen McCormick, of Princes Park, Liverpool, and was educated at St Silas' School and at the Liverpool School of Commerce, and at the outbreak of war was employed with Messrs: Elder, Dempster & Co, as a clerk in their stores department at Colonial House, Water Street, Liverpool. When the bugle sounded, like so many of his comrades in the shipping offices, he joined the "Pals" enlisting in the 1st Battalion on 3rd September, 1914. With that unit, which was so shortly to perform brilliant deeds on the battlefields of Europe, he underwent his course of training at various centres in England until November the following year, when he crossed over to France. The regiment was quickly in the front line positions, and took part in all those unspectacular but arduous operations which preceded the greater events of 1916 and onwards. He was still with the "Pals" when the first Battle of Somme opened in July, 1916, the first offensive engagement which was undertaken by the British Army on a stupendous scale.

It was during those operations,--in the storming of Guillemont--that Lieuenant McCormick was wounded in the face. He was sent for treatment in hospital to England, but on his discharge, and having by this time won his stripes, he applied for a commission in early 1917, went through his cadet training at Hertford College, Oxford, and was gazetted to the 18th Battalion Northumberland Fusiliers on November 23rd that year.
While with the forces both in the training camp and at the front Lieut. McCormick was very popular, and his musical abilities added much to the cheerfulness of his comrades. He was a clever pianist, and acted as accompanist for "The Blighties Pierrot Troupe,"  whose concerts enlivened the camp. This company later became celebrated as "The King's Jesters." But he was as capable in soldierly skill. A crack shot, while in training at Grantham and Salisbury he won the competition for shooting, and was awarded a silver cigarette case besides gaining the Cross Guns Badge. 

During the war, on September 15th, 1915, Liuet. McCormick had been married to Miss. Edith Tatham, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. John Tatham of Aigburth, but his new duty at the front was to sever that happy bond on earth at least. In January, 1918, he was again in the fighting line, attached to the 9th Battalion of the Northumberland Fusiliers, and had to pass through the severest trial the British Army endured throughout the war-- in the period of the great German advance. He had some narrow escapes--on one occasion his revolver was shattered in his hand by a piece of shell-- and received his fatal wound as stated on August 9th.

The occasion was described by his Commanding Officer Lieut. Col W. A. Vignoles, as follows: 
"The company was ordered to place a bridge across a stream -- (Lieut. McCormick's work had been with the engineering section)--between our own and the enemy's line, and to eastablish a bridgehead on the far side. The Company succeededi n getting across, but were met on the other side by very heavy fire."  In this way Lieut. McCormick was hit, and in spite of medical aid died shortly after at the regimental aid-post."   
"Though McCormick had not been very long with the Battalion" testified his Commanding Officer, " we had all learned to appreciate his worth, and the Battalion loses in him a very gallant and capable officer. He was one of the best subalterns in the Battalion. He died doing his duty, like the gallant gentleman he was, setting an example of coolness and bravery to all around him under very trying circumstances.
He was buried at Tannay. His friends lost a good comrade and the nation a good soldier, and a man whose career in the arts of peace promised well.   

The above extract was taken from Liverpool's Scroll of Fame 



Frank joined the 17th Battalion as Private 15535. The 1911 census shows him as a 21 year old clerk living with his parents and his sister Jessie. 

On 22/09/1915  then aged 25 he married Edith Tatham aged 24 at St Michael's in the Hamlet Church. Frank gave his residence at the time as Larkhill Camp.(His best man was also a Pal; Leonard Wilson Blackstone who was a Serjeant in the 19th Battalion and was killed in action on 15th November, 1917 and is commemorated on the Tyne Cot Memorial). 

He now lies in Thiennes British Cemetery where his headstone bears the poignant epitaph: "MY CHUM"

His next of kin is shown as Edith McCormick of 7, St. Michael's Road, Aigburth, Liverpool. It is highly probable that it was Edith who placed the epitaph on Frank's headstone. 

He is also commemorated on the War Memorial at St Michael's Church, St Michaels Church Rd, St Michael In The Hamlet, Liverpool

We currently have no further information on Frank Pockett McCormick, If you have or know someone who may be able to add to the history of this soldier, please contact us.

Killed On This Day.

(104 Years this day)
Wednesday 9th August 1916.
Sgt 15718 Charles Kenneth Imison
27 years old

(104 Years this day)
Wednesday 9th August 1916.
Pte 36764 Thomas Christopher Jervis

(104 Years this day)
Wednesday 9th August 1916.
Pte 22247 Thomas Pemberton Saul
27 years old

(102 Years this day)
Friday 9th August 1918.
2nd Lieutenant Frank Pockett Mccormick
28 years old